Winning the War Against Childhood Cancer

Winning the War Against Childhood Cancer


Leukemia strikes more children than any other
cancer. I’m Erin White and this is a dailyRx Feature. Leukemia starts in the blood cells, making
them grow out of control and interfering with the function of other cells in the body. Most
childhood leukemias start in the white blood cells, which are part of the immune system
and fight off infections and other invaders. Symptoms of leukemia include infections that
appear frequently, fevers that don’t go away, pain in the bones or joints and enlarged lymph
nodes among other signs. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia makes up about 75 percent of cases.
90 percent of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia can be cured to date. Treatments
such as chemotherapy, radiation and stem cell transplants can be used. Ask your pediatrician
about your child’s risk of cancer. For dailyRx TV, I’m Erin White.