WHAT IS DIASTOLIC HEART FAILURE? (DIASTOLIC HEART FAILURE PATHOPHYSIOLOGY)

WHAT IS DIASTOLIC HEART FAILURE? (DIASTOLIC HEART FAILURE PATHOPHYSIOLOGY)


In this video we’re diving into what diastolic
heart failure actually is. You’ve probably heard about it in nursing
school and you definitely need to know the pathophysiology for it. So I’m actually going to walk you through
the 4 steps of diastolic heart failure, so that you can finally understand it. Let’s do it. My name is Christina Rafano from nursingschoolofsuccess.com
and here on the nursing school show we give you the tips and resources you need to be
successful in your RN program. And today, I’ve got another step-by-step video
for you, I know you like things broken down step-by-step, and today it’s all about diastolic
heart failure. So when you think about diastolic heart failure,
I want you to think of big, big muscles. So your heart is a muscle, right? And when it works really really hard, that
muscle gets bigger. And that’s what’s happening during diastolic
heart failure. The heart has to work super duper hard, and
it’s muscles, those ventricles, get bigger. And when this happens, the ventricles can’t
relax as much, they get really tight. So let’s think about this: When you go to
the gym and work out REALLY hard, your muscles get bigger. And what do you do afterward? You stretch your muscles, or else they’ll
get really tight. And that’s exactly what’s going on here. The heart has been working out so hard, but
it hasn’t had a break to stretch itself out. So over time, it just gets bigger and bigger,
and more tight, and the heart just can’t relax. So let’s put this into a step by step process,
you know I’m all about the steps and I know you love them too. So here’s a step-by-step process for diastolic
heart failure, now you won’t see this anywhere else, I just made it up to make learning this
a whole lot easier for you. So the first step is a trigger or a cause. This is something that is causing the heart
to have to work super hard. So for diastolic heart failure, it could be
things like hypertension, so the heart has a tough time pumping out blood into all those
smaller blood vessels, or ischemia, where there’s just isn’t enough blood going to the
heart. There’s many possible causes, but it all comes
down to the heart needing to work harder, or possibly genetics. Now, the second step of diastolic heart failure
is that the heart works super duper hard to pump that blood out, and the ventricles get
bigger and tighter. And this leads to the 3rd step, which is where
the ventricles of the heart can’t relax because they are so tight. So the ventricles are getting bigger and thicker,
and they can’t relax. And the 4th step, and the key really to all
of this, is a decrease in cardiac output. This is a big fancy phrase for how much blood
the heart can pump out in one minute. So in diastolic heart failure, the ventricles
are getting so big, so naturally, there isn’t as much space inside them for blood to fill. So because there’s not as much blood inside
the ventricles to start out with, there’s less blood being pumped out to the body. And this is where you end up with those signs
and symptoms of heart failure: shortness of breath, swelling, fatigue, crackles in the
lungs, decreased urine output, all of those things. Now if you’re a NursingSOS member, I have
a whole video for you inside of the membership community on the signs and symptoms of heart
failure. It walks you through the signs and symptoms,
as well as some critical thinking so that you understand the “why” behind each one. So if you’re a NursingSOS member, you will
definitely want check that video out. And if you aren’t? GIRRRRLLLL, head on over there and sign up,
you are going to LOVE it! Alright, so that is what’s happening during
diastolic heart failure: the heart is working so hard that is gets really big, and stiff,
and it just can’t relax. And this causes the cardiac output to decrease,
so the body just isn’t getting as much blood as it was before. So I hope that helped you understand diastolic
heart failure a little better. If you loved this step-by-step guide for diastolic
heart failure: write LOVE in the comments below. I want to know your thoughts. And of course, make sure you hit the like
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show. Take care.