What is a Psychiatrist? Therapy? Medication? | Kati Morton

What is a Psychiatrist? Therapy? Medication? | Kati Morton


Hey everybody! Today I have a wonderful and special guest, Dr. Barry Lieberman, is here to talk with us about medication, psychiatry, and the works. So stay tuned. (Intro Music) So like I said, I have a wonderful and special guest. My friend Barry is here to talk with us about psychiatry and medication and answer all of our questions. I’ve heard from a lot of you that you either are told you need to see a psychiatrist and you have some concerns. So I guess Barry my first question is What is a psychiatrist and why would someone need to see them? Barry: Well a psychiatrist is a medical doctor, whose trained in both psychological problems and general medicine, and specifically the overlap between medical issues pertaining to anxiety and depression and the psychological components of that. So psychiatrists usually can do both psychotherapy and oriented psychotherapy or supportive psychotherapy. But also do medications. But interestingly enough even today, I saw somebody who has a medical condition, but the emotional reaction to that medical condition allows me to treat both that condition and treat him with anti- anxiety medication. Kati: Oh interesting. And I have a lot of viewers who have chronic illness or other things that contribute to mental health issues. Barry: Right Kati: So you said that some psychiatrists do do psychotherapy as well. Barry: Yeah, fewer and fewer. I get complaints from people a lot. That now when they see a psychiatrist, they see them for ten minutes just for a psychopharmacologic, i.e. anti depressant or anti psychotic or anti anxiety medication. But more, but, and that’s happening more and more to my chagrin. Kati: Mmhmm Barry: I actually was not only trained in, but valued do psychotherapy and medications at the same time. Kati: Yeah and I, for those of you who are curious kind of what the format is. It used to be, just like when you see a therapist like me, you see them for about an hour. Barry: Right Kati: And so it gave the psychiatrist more information. I honestly think, so they can better diagnose and treat. Barry: That’s right. Kati: But now, they call it kind of med management is when you see somebody for maybe 15 to 20 minutes. Barry: Right Kati: And they, a lot of my clients have even told me, ‘Hey you’ve sent me to this person. I walked in, and they’re like how are you side effects, duh duh duh.’ It’s just strictly about their medicine and then they want them to leave. So knowing that it’s transitioning to that, do you think that there will be many psychiatrists left who do psychotherapy? Barry: Well I hope so. I mean just babysat for a wedding of a 36 year old psychiatrist in San Francisco who does do psychotherapy in addition to medications. Kati: Oh that’s good to know. Barry: So I’m glad to see people doing it, because it really bothers me. I am one of those people who definitely believes in treating the whole patient. And a patient is not just a bundle of chemicals. Kati: Yeah, agreed. And I think it’s good for those of you out there to know that you have options and different psychiatrists available to you to fit your needs. So just like when you find a therapist, I tell you make sure you kind of like them enough that you could talk with them. Make sure that when you’re looking into a psychiatrist, if you have insurance and there’s a big list they send you, try out a couple until you feel a connection. Or maybe find someone who does therapy if that’s what you’re wanting as well. So that maybe you get that it’s a one stop shop. You don’t have to see, you know a Barry and myself. You just go see your psychiatrist and they do therapy as well. Just make sure you’re always comfortable and doing what’s right for you. Thank you so much for answering our questions. Barry: Sure. By the way I compare that to dating. Kati: It’s true! Barry: As to the compatibility, mutual compatibility. Kati: Yeah, yeah. I always tell them you at least have to feel like ‘I like you enough to maybe see you again.’ Barry: Yeah, yeah. Kati: That’s how to tell. Barry: Say the same thing. By the way even the use of medication, I’ll use the metaphor of dating, or the analogy to dating. Kati: Yeah. Barry: Because medication that might work wonderfully for the exact same condition for one person might not be effective or may be even intolerable for somebody else. Kati: That’s a really good analogy. Barry: So, yeah, so the whole process. And when we’re dating we often say I don’t feel chemistry for that person, so when we’re doing chemistry with these medications. I say uh, dating. Kati: That’s true. What works for one person doesn’t work for all of us. So thank you so much. And we will have Barry on to answer more of your questions, so make sure you click here to subscribe and check out my other videos. Until next time. Barry: I’ve been in this world a long time. Kati: I know. You’re more seasoned than I am when it comes to filming I’m sure. Barry: I have also done interviews too before. Kati: Yeah, that’s true. Sean (camera man): And 3, 2 … Kati: Hey everybody! Today I have a wonderful special guest, my friend Barry here is going blah… I didn’t like that. Let’s start over. I need to say Dr. Barry Lieb, even though I know you don’t. But you know, I’d never call you Doctor, but you’re always like just call me Barry. Barry: Sir. Kati: Sir Barry. (Laughter) Kati: Okay, one more time. We can do that version too. Sean (camera man): Okay. It’s starting to … Kati: Oh, it’s starting to Barry: I can’t repeat that shit all over again. Kati: I don’t like it Sean. Ehhh. Get it right. (Laughter) Sean: All right, I just wanted to Barry: If I need to pick my nose or Kati’s nose Kati: Just pick it. (Indiscernible talking) Kati: Just go for it. (Laughter) Subtitles by the Amara.org community