Vegan YouTuber Who Claimed Raw Food Cured Her Cancer Has Died | What’s Trending Now!

Vegan YouTuber Who Claimed Raw Food Cured Her Cancer Has Died | What’s Trending Now!


YouTube vlogger Mari Lopez, who claimed
that a vegan diet and prayer had cured her breast cancer, has died. Welcome back
to What’s Trending, I’m Shira Lazar. Be sure to like this video and subscribe
for more social media news daily. Mari was part of a YouTube vlogging duo
with her niece, Liz Johnson. As Liz and Mari, they had a small but active
following on YouTube and earned a living through content they posted behind a
paywall on Vimeo. In their most popular video, Liz
and Mari make a smoothie called a Lemon Ginger Blast, which they call a “Cancer
Killer.” The pair also argued that their faith in God was essential to defeating
the illness. In order to get healing like this, you have to go to God first and
there’s a lot of people that will criticize and say well you can’t just be
healed by faith, which is partly true because you have to have faith. Good
works. Yes. Together. The description in their first video reads: “She was healed
by changing her habits, environment, nutrition, and spiritual walk. Mari was
healed in 4 months by juicing.” But Mari’s stage four cancer had not disappeared and
the disease spread to her lungs, blood, and liver. Mari even believed that her
faith had cured her homosexuality. She said: “I was healed by God and faith and
used to live a gay lifestyle.” So obviously what they both practiced and
what Liz still believes in is controversial. And cancer advocates have
worked for years to prevent the spread of false information regarding
treatments. And the use of religious faith to deny one’s sexuality continues to
be a source of great anguish in communities around the world. So
naturally some of the comments around the story have been pretty harsh. Holly
Wilder wrote: “People like Liz are the worst kind of crazy. Not only does their
insanity hurt them, but it drags in other people and spreads somehow.” And Richard
Bennett said: “The vegan wife of a vegan friend of mine is dying of cancer at
this very moment. According to you reprehensible moonbats who counsel diet instead of medicine, that’s impossible. Delete your accounts and never post on the Internet again.” In response, Liz has
disabled comments on her channel and in her first video since Mari’s death, Liz
defends herself and her beliefs from detractors. She was diagnosed with cancer
at the same time she had just renewed her faith in God and she changed her
lifestyle because she was a lesbian before and she decided that she wanted
to make a change. It wasn’t because I’m claiming that juicing healed her of a
gay lifestyle. I think that’s the most ridiculous thing that I’ve seen so far.
In the description of the new video, Liz says that Mari ended her vegan diet and
started doing radiation treatment and chemotherapy before her death. And she
told Babe.net that she believes Mari’s health wouldn’t have worsened had she
stuck to her vegan diet. She’s also defending herself against
accusations that she forced Mari to renounce her sexuality. This is tough
because you want to be fair and sensitive to this family as they’re
grieving a death. But cancer and sexuality are serious issues and you
have to be careful with the information that you spread around the Internet
claiming that you found the solution to something that’s very serious and real when you have no evidence to back you. The point is, that Lemon Ginger Blast is
full of vegetables and things that are very good for you, but it’s probably not
the cure for cancer. Liz now says she plans to continue her channel and even
may post the videos behind the Vimeo pay wall for free on YouTube. This topic is
clearly important to Harry Shukman, who interviewed Liz Johnson for Babe.net. One
of his previous posts for the site profiles blogger Brittney Auerbach, who
has over 100,000 subscribers on her channel
Montreal Healthy Girl. Shukman calls Auerbach a piece of sh*t for trying to profit off
desperate cancer patients by saying that her method will stop the growth of new
cancer cells “overnight.” It’s tough because people like Auerbach might
really believe in what they’re preaching to people watching them without
realizing that they may be swaying people away from actual effective
treatments. And while a lot of people might live or die by the things their
favorite influencers tell them to do, it’s important to remain cautious,
skeptical, and do your research. In 2016, a famous Australian wellness blogger, Elle
Gibson, who claims natural remedies cured her terminal brain cancer, admitted that
it was all a lie. So what do you guys think? Is it
dangerous for people to believe in the healing
hours of prayer and vegan diets? Let us know in the comments below, be sure to
like, and subscribe for more of What’s Trending.