Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension and stem cells: how research helps patients (10)

Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension and stem cells: how research helps patients (10)


– Your research focuses on how blood vessels
and lungs change in disease. You show that inflammation in lungs leads
to change in vascular architecture, the lung undergoes, the blood vessels undergo remodeling
process. You also have a mouse model that mimics closely
the pulmonary arterial hypertension. So how does your research help people with
lung disease? Dr. Anton Titov MD What are the current directions of your research
in pulmonary arterial hypertension and other lung vascular diseases? I think the things that we’ve learned from
some of the work we’ve done here, is really the role of inflammation in driving vascular
remodeling. We’ve looked at several aspects of inflammation
and we’ve used a number of models. You mentioned the mouse model that was an
IL-6 over-producer that remodeled their lung blood vessels much like human disease. Although it’s still not a clean model of human
disease. Also in collaboration with Dr. Jane Leopold
in cardiology, we’ve developed a large animal model using a pig model, where we can tie
off the inferior pulmonary vein and that drives a timed remodeling of the pulmonary vascular
bed and the right heart. So we’ve been able to use that as a model
of progressive pulmonary vascular remodeling and kind of an accurate timing of right heart
dysfunction and eventually right heart failure. And we’ve been able to look at different things
like administering stem cells using an intracoronary approach and showing viability of those stem
cells. That model may also allow us to ask the question
about devices. And could we put in a ventricular assist device
in the setting of right heart failure that might actually help remodel the vascular bed
and obviously support the right ventricle? But questions about pulsatile blood flow versus
non-pulsatile flow… There may be benefit to non-pulsatile blood
flow in the pulmonary vascular bed. But I think getting back to your question
about how it is affected how we treat patients, we right now start to do clinical trials in
anti-inflammatory treatments, including anti IL-6 or medicines that affect targets to the
IL-6 receptors and downstream effectors of those receptors as well as stem-cell approaches,
and even device approaches. – It’s certainly very interesting because
it has direct clinical implications and can help understand the pathophysiology of the
lung disease better for patients with lung diseases.