Oncology Care Model Experiences – The Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders

Oncology Care Model Experiences – The Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders


We wanted to be part of the Oncology Care Model simply because we want to be on the forefront of how oncology care is delivered in the future. We’ve always focused on quality in this practice, so we wanted to keep that momentum going and to improve patient care and OCM has given us the resources to do that. With the Oncology Care Model it’s very much the team approach. I’m part of the team including the physician the advanced practitioners, the patients from the beginning have a care plan, they know what their disease process is, they know what their treatment entails, having access to their physicians twenty four seven all of that is super important and has increased quality of care since the Oncology Care Model. OCM focuses on a team approach to care, it’s not just about the patient’s cancer it’s about the patient. And OCM has allowed us to put this philosophy into daily practice. It makes us more accountable, and all of our team members have to come together to be successful in this program. One of the most special parts of being the patient’s Nurse Case Manager is that I?m their person. They know that I’m on their team, they know they can call me, they know that there’s nothing that they can’t say to me. They can cry they can celebrate they can ask the questions they are afraid to ask . . . to be their, not only their liaison but their advocate and part of being a Nurse Case Manager is, a huge part of that is being their advocate. It’s a very caring and compassionate people that work here. I really love the Case Manager. I can call her and talk to her any time I have any problems. They helped me get through my husband’s death. They referred me to Hospice and Sherri has helped me greatly going through his death. Know what to expect, what to do. I’ve worked with many patients over the years through the OCM program, one that comes to mind is Nancy. Her husband was also a patient of mine and then he unfortunately died of stage four gastric cancer. That was very difficult for all of us to see and for Nancy to go through, but despite that she continued on with her cancer journey through using some of the psycho-social support services that we were able to provide for her. My husband was diagnosed with cancer so both of us came together, and sat next to each other upstairs in the treatment room and pretty much there for each other. And it was just awesome care for both of us. Unfortunately his cancer was stage four and he only lived for twelve months, but they were there with me through the whole time. In the beginning of the model it was about getting these processes and implementing some of these things, such as care plan visits and survivorship visits and depression screenings but ultimately it was about risk stratification, which patients are going to have the most issues and which patients need that intervention. So we went from looking at data to then looking at overall care and how we can improve it. They usually tell you, for my type of cancer, this is the treatment that they’re gonna offer to me. And they give me a book and it tells me all the side effects that’s gonna happen to it. Tells me if I’m gonna loose my hair . . . what medicines I need to take, precautions, what foods to eat. They send me to a nutritionist that works here at the Center, all that is gone over with Dr. Ganesa. I have stomach cancer as well as I had ovarian cancer. It made me very proud to be able to make a decision on my treatment. Don’t put your cancer treatments off if you’re a newly diagnosed patient let them treat you as fast as possible. Ask a lot of questions, go on the internet look up your . . . look up your treatment. I looked up my treatment, what the side effects were, what other treatments you can have. Ask around and ask other people at the Center that are going through the treatments because they will give you information you’re not aware of, because it’s amazing. They offer psychiatric treatment, they offer nutritional information here, and I love the support that I get from the nurses and the doctors here. Everybody came together and listened to the patient about her goals of care, and that she wanted quality of life and what she wanted out of her life. OCM is a different care model, what’s exciting is that it completely changes the way we think of patients. It’s a Medical Home model, and a Medical Home model really changes our sense of what all we are responsible for in that patient. So it goes back to not just treating the patient’s cancer but treating the entire patient. I think the OCM model is going to, not only catch on and spread because it’s to increase quality of care, it’s for cost savings. If we can increase quality of care, limit, decrease, or even eliminate ER visits, hospitalizations, and ensure that Medicare is there for future generations, that’s a win win for everybody.