Life saving app for recovering heart attack patients

Life saving app for recovering heart attack patients


[Music plays] (Dr. Mohan Karunanithi)
Every year there’s about 55,000 Australians who
suffer a heart attack. That’s, when you look at it, in terms of scale it’s one
in every ten minutes somebody’s having
a heart attack. So it’s really
quite significant. (Professor Darren Walters)
And once you’ve had a heart attack you’re at high
risk for further problems over the course of your life. One thing that you can do that will
help prevent people needing to come back into hospital is to
undertake cardiac rehabilitation. Cardiac Rehabilitation’s really
an overall comprehensive programme around life
style modification, risk factor modification. The development of the
sustainable exercise strategies to lower your risk
into the future. The trouble is, for various reasons
we can’t get people to cardiac rehab. They either are not referred
or if they’re referred they don’t come or if they do
come they don’t see it through. Imagine if you could conduct this
research using a smart phone. Put physiological
parameters into the phone like a weight and blood
pressure, track it over time, do all the things you’d
do in a rehab setting. (Dr. Mohan Karunanithi) The
Smartphone app captures health measurements and the life
style risk factor modification. It also provides education
and motivational components that will give you an
SMS text messages. The information from
there is uploaded into a clinical programme which
a care mentor uses to provide weekly consultation
through the six week programme. (Professor Darren Walters)
We get twice as many people through using
this technology than we could if we just
referred them to a community based
rehabilitation programme and that has the potential
over the long course. If you double the number
of people going to rehab to save lives and save money. (Dr. Mohan Karunanithi) The smart
phone helps them to complete the cardiac rehab programme simply because it aligns with
the patient’s daily routine. (Chris Porter) My name is
Chris and I got the app from Queensland health
after I had a heart event. The app prompt me with my
rehabilitation every day. They sent information through and
motivational and educational tutorials and so every day I would see more
and more changes in my lifestyle and moving away from the
lifestyle that I had that created the heart event. (Dr. Mohan Karunanithi) It takes
them through providing education so that it can inform them of their
health condition and what more… and how to motivate themselves
into self managing the condition. (Chris Porter) Managing
my own rehabilitation certainly gives you a certain
amount of empowerment that you’re not having to rely
on going to the doctors or going to some sort of health
professional all the time. (Professor Darren Walters) CSIRO
have been a pleasure to work with. I mean finding someone who will
partner and make your concepts or your ideas and turn
them into a reality, that’s… that’s been, you
know, very satisfying. It’s been an incredible journey. (Dr. Mohan Karunanithi) Without
working with Queensland Health we wouldn’t have actually been
able to deliver the care delivery that closely aligns
with what is… currently providing the
traditional skill. (Professor Darren Walters) We have
demonstrated “Wow, this works”. People have embraced the technology
and that’s the exciting phase. We have embedded this now in
usual practice for people and we’re currently transitioned
it into a real option for people in Metro North
and in West Morton. And I think this trial for
the first time gives you that level of evidence and confidence
that these new interventions do work. (Dr. Mohan Karunanithi) Well if you
look at cardiac rehab and the app that we’ve got now it addresses
risk factors very similar to other chronic diseases. And what we are looking
at extending is to this pulmonary diseases,
diabetes and heart failure. (Professor Darren Walters) All of
these conditions could be managed through
a similar type platform. [Music playing]