Kidney MRI and CT – Cancer Screening Blood in Urine – Painless Hematuria (11)

Kidney MRI and CT – Cancer Screening Blood in Urine – Painless Hematuria (11)


– To stay in the abdominal area, let’s touch
upon MRI and CT of the kidneys and adrenal glands. Dr. Anton Titov MD When is kidney MRI or CT indicated? How can CT or MRI benefit someone with a known
or suspected kidney disease? Kidney disease really falls into three categories. There’s disease of the kidney itself. It causes the kidneys to fail. That’s usually evaluated by kidney biopsy
and there’s very little role for imaging in kidney diseases of that kind. We call that diffuse or medical kidney disease. Then there’s kidney tumors. Renal tumors generally present with blood
in the urine, blood that you can’t see. Maybe blood that is only detectable by looking
at the urine under the microscope. Painless hematuria we call that. Those tumors can be diagnosed by imaging. Ultrasound is usually the first choice. But ultrasound also can miss small tumors. Many older people have blood in their urine,
they may have renal CT or MRI scan even if ultrasound of kidneys is normal. And the third area of kidney disease is blockage
of the urine coming out the kidneys going into the bladder. That tube that leads from the kidneys into
the bladder is called a ureter. So something is blocking a ureter. The name for it is hydronephrosis, or water
distention of the kidney. And that is evaluated by ultrasound primarily. And similar to the bile duct situation, the
ultrasound is very good at showing blockage. But ultrasound is not so good at showing the
cause of blockage. If there is no blockage then patients are
generally done with imaging of kidney for kidney failure. But if ultrasound shows blockages then they
will generally go on to the next diagnostic step, which is the CT or MRI of the kidneys
to show what is causing the blockage.