Karli’s story: A warrior in the fight against childhood cancer

Karli’s story: A warrior in the fight against childhood cancer


(Heavy rainfall) – I remember, it was like yesterday, it was a Tuesday morning around
10 o’clock in the morning, October 26th, and the phone rang. And that’s, like, when my world stopped. (piano and violin music) I came home, Karen was
sitting on the couch, right here in the living room, and I said “I got bad
news.” “Karli has cancer.” I remember her from just
the moment she was born, and, no, this was my little girl, and just the thought of losing
her, just can’t handle it, I would probably want to
die, she’s just, my princess. (Soothing music) – When I was little, I
loved taking my parents like, cameras and going
outside and taking photos, and I’ve always liked it,
but when I was diagnosed, and I got like my phone
and stuff like that. I would just take pictures,
because it was a way for me to, like, get out to people,
like, what I’m going through. Two weeks after I got my
port put in I started Chemo, it was scary because I’ve never
been to a hospital before. It’s hard in the beginning, but you get used to the treatments, going in every week, or every day. Sorry, (quiet sobs) the
memories sometimes, like, come rushing in and a bunch of different emotions just run through your head, it’s just, like, a big crazy thing. There were hard days,
there were good days, there were sad days and bad days, but you had to act like a warrior and you have to be strong through it. Going through treatment,
I met so many people. Most of them would be, like, littler kids, and it was hard seeing that, because, like, knowing
what I’m going through, and that it’s hard, I
wonder how it is for them. When I think of the word Cancer, I think of this horrible
monster that kills people. This hurts kids, and it’s
just a horrible disease. No kid should know like, what, how many doses of chemo they need, and what medicines they need to take. – When your child is sick, anything, you worry about the cancer, it’s totally out of your control, there’s nothing you
can do to take it away. You can’t do the treatments for her, you take it very personal. – Arnold Palmer Hospital, it was my second home
for probably like a year. The nurses at Arnold Palmer, they were all so, like,
welcoming, and nice. Being there all the time, it’s like they become your friends, and your, like family almost. – From the reception desk in the front where you just walk in, to
Lily, who cleaned the rooms, and came in and mopped our floor. Every single person is
put there for these kids. They know that these are kids, they know that this is tough for them. And they know that when
the kids are there, that’s the closest thing to
home that they have right then. – My doctors, oh my
gosh, they’re so amazing. They would, like, cheer me up, especially Dr.Sutphin, he
knew when I was in a bad mood, he would just make me laugh. The happiest day was
when I left Arnold palmer for my last treatment stay. Me and the nurses, we all
had a little get together, and we all cried tears of joy. – Today she’s healthy, and through the wonderful doctors
at Arnold Palmer Hospital, She’s alive and well. (guitar music) – When you say Arnold Palmer Hospital, I just think of the amazing staff, everybody there is so amazing, without it I wouldn’t be here. – I can’t think of a better cause, than the care of children, especially those who are diagnosed with life threatening illnesses. – You go through so much
stuff on that floor, but it’s also a good
thing, ’cause that floor, it’s the place where I got healed. – If you can support
the care of these kids, and if you can see how
it changes their lives, it’s worth it.