How To Remove Motorcycle Fork Lugs & Shock Clevis

How To Remove Motorcycle Fork Lugs & Shock Clevis


What’s happening guys, so today we are working on some suspension and one thing I’ve never really seen info on or seen a video on is how to remove the fork lugs off the fork tube and Remove the shock clevis off the shaft. Now I’ve already got the forks completely apart ready to pull the lugs off shock is still together But as far as I know this process is pretty similar for Showa, WP as far as KYB Forks, I’ve heard that the lugs are pretty tough to get off So I really don’t have much info on that and then the Shawn clevis Dot is pretty much gonna be the same for any brand shock now This is a set of sho of suspension of 2003 cr250 that i’ve got back here and without further ado Let’s get this stuff ripped apart now There’s a couple reasons why you need to pull the fourth lugs or the shock clevis off the first beam To replace a damaged tube or damaged shock shaft and the other reason being to do some coatings like what I’m doing gonna be doing Coatings on lower tubes the shock shaft and wahla Matic gonna do the clevis and the lugs as well So whatever you’re doing this process will work for you Now the first step in removing, the lugs on the forks is to get a good clamp on the tube And that is what this clamp sets for it’s got many different sizes. This is a forty seven millimeter fork So we’ll be using that one these just slip right inside of The outer clamp there clamp on to the fork tube and then you put this whole set up in the vise like that a little tip I learned from My buddy Jared Keller who works over at GG rmx is to use Windex inside of the clamp That’ll prevent the tube from spinning in the clamp now for you guys that are gonna tackle this project at home I will link this clamp set down below in the description. So you’ll want to make sure your tube is completely free of any oil grab your Windex and Get your clamp on there Now we can get it set up in the vise so you’ll want to get this thing set up with the Set screw on the lug facing up because we’re gonna need to get access to that Okay so how the lug is secured on to the tube is through the set screw and that hole there and then also a tunnel lock tight inside the threads on the tube and so that set screw prevents the love from spinning off of the tube and Many times in order to prevent that screw from backing out. They’ll actually peen the threads Meaning like they fold the aluminum over inside of the threads and in order to remove that screw We’ll need to drill out that peening If you look really close you can see the aluminum is like punched down into the threads or like into the screw And so that’s what we need to drill out. So we’re gonna drill into this thing with a five millimeter drill bit So you’re gonna want to find a hex bit or Allen did that fits really tight inside that that set screw Don’t want to strip it out and then that screw is held in by lock tight So we’re gonna use a torch to break that free Before you try to crank on the screw make sure all of those bits and any dirt is out of it Sweet looks like it’s coming loose You can see all that lock tight that was inside of there using some heat always helps break that stuff loose cool That wasn’t too difficult and then you’re gonna want to blow up those threads with an air compressor Clean out all that junk and it is recommended to use a mill end bit to clean up the threads Inside there the threads on the actual tube since the set screw kind of damages them now I bought the wrong size mill and bit so I’m gonna see if I can get away without using one now We’re gonna get ready to remove the lug and in order to get some good leverage on it I’m gonna put the axle back into the lug and put the pinch bolts in Alright, so what we’re gonna do is heat up the fork lug right here where the threads are it’s gonna take a ton of heat To break down that lock tight and then gonna squirt some grease in through that hole that threaded hole where the set screw was and That’ll help lube up the threads as we’re spinning the lug loose Hopefully after a bunch of heat and some grease this lug will break loose Cheese off I am so pumped that ended up working out having that clamp Definitely made the job a lot easier Now if you don’t have clamp or you don’t feel like spend the money on one What you can do is put the lug in the vise obviously with some soft jaws and then use a screwdriver chop Through these two holes on top of the tube And that shouldn’t able you to spin the lug loose but that’s kind of sketchy business in my opinion So I invested in the clamp. All right, let’s get busting on the other side fork Now with the Forex completely apart, it’s time to turn our attention to the shock Now to remove the shot clevis, we’re gonna use a holding tool just like we did with the forks This one is from race tech picked it up on Rocky Mountain It can be used for a 14 millimeter 16 millimeter or 18 millimeter shock shaft I believe this one is 16 mil. You want to start with a completely clean shock shaft, make sure there’s no oil on it Right with Windex. There are some pinch bolts here on the clamp makes that a nice secure fit Tighten those puppies down. I’m gonna go ahead and pop it in the vise Before you do anything else you want to make sure your rebound adjuster is all the way back down and since I’ll be pulling the shaft completely apart, I’m gonna take out the set screw for the rebound adjuster and Screw on the bottom as well As You can imagine the clevis is held on by a bunch of Loctite on those threads And we’re gonna need some heat to break that stuff up Probably a good idea to pull this rebound adjuster out or we get too carried away Oh That’s hot I can scorch my finger on that see if we can get this adjuster rod out of here All right that is it for removing the clevis pretty simple deal Just like the fourth time to get all these parts cleaned up and ready for coatings. Some of the stuff is really nasty I’m gonna drop it all in the handy. Dandy parts washer over here always does some magic Everything cleaned up really really nicely. This stuff is just Spotless now in order to do coatings on the lower fork tubes and the shock shaft The chrome has to be a near-perfect shape there can’t be any major pits scratches or Wear through the chrome now before I send these out to my guy in, California to do the coatings I’m gonna buff all these scratches out over on the buffing machine and what we’re going to be using for that is What they call a loose wheel and we’re gonna combine that with a white Rouge compound Now the very last thing I’ll be doing with these tubes is cleaning up the threads Definitely got to make sure all of that Loctite is off of there and to do that I’ll be using the finer wheel over here on the grinder. Just going to use super light pressure. So we don’t remove too much material So you can see right there on the threads that’s where the lock screw was So we’re gonna spend a little extra time and cleaning that up The wheel removed all of the burrs from that lock screw and cleaned up the threads really nicely So we are all finished up with these tubes. Now when you’re putting these back together. There’s a couple things you want to consider Definitely pull out the bottoming cones out of the tubes clean up really good and replace the openings on the bottom And on the side and then for the shock pull out the rebound adjuster clean that up really good. We greased it so works smoothly and For threadlocker, you’ll want to use red loctite on Both the forks and on the shock So I know this video had a lot of the same content as the fork in shock disassembly video But I’ve never really seen much info on specifically removing the clevis and fork lugs So I decided to do a completely separate video on that. Anyways, thanks for watching guys I hope you enjoyed it until next time keep it for an You