How To Lower Blood Pressure Naturally With L-Arginine And Exercise – High BP Treatment Supplement

How To Lower Blood Pressure Naturally With L-Arginine And Exercise – High BP Treatment Supplement


How To Lower Blood Pressure Naturally With
Arginine and Exercise Hi, my name is Usuff.
Actually, I’m his voiceover guy. But he likes my voice so much, I’m him for this video.
My blood pressure has been remaining stubbornly high for quite a while.
In mid November 2012 it averaged 150/100. Not good.
Arginine lowers my high blood pressure for a day.
It works when I combine it with exercise. Here’s my story.
My cardiologist diagnosed me with insulin resistance and told me to get my BP down to
consistently below 135/85. Or else it’s the meds.
Which I prefer not to take IF there is a choice. Here’s a list of the possible side effects
from the medication my cardiologist is for recommending
me. When I asked him about it, he said 90% of
people DON’T experience any. And only 10% do.
And that taking a small pill every day is far far better than suffering a stroke and
spending the rest of my life disabled in nursing home,
unable to move one side of my body. He’s got a point.
He gave me a three month deadline. So I’m pulling out all the stops to find natural
blood pressure lowering supplements, and I found
one in arginine. Arginine is an amino acid and is a natural
and fairly inexpensive supplement. I take arginin ONLY before exercising, and
not at other times. Here’s how I measure out my dose of arginine.
I turn on my digital scale. I place an empty cup on top and get a reading
for how much it weighs. I then write this down just in case I forget.
You know, my short term memory is being affected by my high blood pressure.
I then add the weight of my dose of arginine, in this case 3 grams, and calculate what the
final weight of the cup should be.
I then get my arginine powder out. I got this brand because it has a high number
of positive user ratings and favorable comments. And it doesn’t cost that much.
Click the link below this video to my blog post to find out where I got it from.
I then carefully spoon the arginine powder into the paper cup bit by bit until the weight
I want is reached.
Now I know I’ve got exactly THREE GRAMS in this cup.
I then add warm water to the cup, stir to dissolve, and drink it.
I’ll take half a dose an hour before exercising, and the other half just a half an hour before.
I like dividing the dose in two and speading it out over time.
This may increase the absorption rate, but I could be wrong.
So here I am taking my arginine within an hour of exercising.
I prefer to use arginine powder over capsules as I have full control over the dose I’m taking.
I’ll then go to the park and do my usual exercise. Not walking in this case. But slow jogging
and interval training, which involves repeated bouts
of faster sprints with walking breaks in between to recover.
The result is that I find arginine lowers my blood pressure for a day, at least.
How do I know? Well, I take my blood pressure once every
morning, so I can see how my BP is trending over
time. Yes, I know BP is highest in the morning.
But taking a reading the first thing is a habit I’ve developed.
So I can get it out of the way and get on with the rest of the day without thinking
about it. Here I’m using the “average of three reading”
setting on my Omron BP monitor, which is more accurate than a single reading.
I tested arginine and exercise on three occasions using doses of two, four and six grams.
This is my BP reading in the morning before taking 2 grams of arginine and exercising.
And this is the reading after, on the next morning.
This is the BP reading before taking any supplementation. And this is my BP after four grams of arginine
and exercise. This is my BP reading before any supplementation.
And this is my result after six grams. It’s pretty obvious arginin IS working for
me. And my BP is dipping because of it.
I’ve summarised my results in this table. To make it clearer, I plotted the results
in a graph form. On the left is the mean arterial pressure.
That’s just an overall figure for my blood pressure.
On the bottom is time, day zero representing before taking the arginine, day one being
the day after arginine and exercise, and day two being
the day after that. I took arginine and exercised only in between
day zero and day one. I did not take arginine or exercise at any
other time. This is the effect from a dose of two grams
of arginine. This dose failed to control the rise in my
BP. If I do nothing, my BP elevates to around
150/100, which is a mean arterial pressure of around
117. Upping the dosage of arginine to 4 grams DID
result in a noticeable drop in BP. Finally, a dose of six grams of arginine produces
an almost identical fall of that from four grams.
So there isn’t much of a difference between taking 4g and 6g.
The big jump is between 2g and 4g. So a total dose of around three grams of arginine
might well be all I need to give me the maximum BP lowering effect.
I believe in taking the minimum dose that will achieve the desired effect.
As taking more won’t help and may lead to over dosing and side effects.
So what’s the scientific evidence for the use of arginine in lowering high blood pressure?
I’ve cited several reports in the literature that speak to arginine’s BP lowering effect.
For example, a 2002 study from the UCLA School of Medicine in Torrance, California,
concluded that “oral arginine may temporarily reduce blood pressure in mildly hypertensive
type 2 diabetic patients.”
Which is about what I am. Insulin resistance is just a mild form of diabetes.
Furthermore, there’s a more recent 2011 meta analysis of 11 randomised double-blind
trials in the American Heart Journal. Which basically
means they looked at eleven studies to see the
overall picture. That analysis concluded that “oral L-arginine
supplementation significantly lowers both systolic
and diastolic BP”. In other words, the science is definitely
there. I prefer to take my arginine just before jogging,
because I feel it has a greater therapeutic effect
that way. I’ll see if this works with weight training.
If it does, I’ll make another video here. I think exercise is what makes arginine work
better. The timing of WHEN you take is important. Take it just before exercising,
so the concentration of arginine in your bloodstream is
at it’s highest. Without exercise, blood pressure may not lower,
or stay low, as much. That’s just my guess.
Let me know your experiences. And let me know whether you find it works
with walking. Arginine is just one of the several supplements
I’m looking at that lowers BP naturally. In future videos, I explore the use of the
others. There are three postscripts to this video.
Postscript number one. For scientific accuracy, my BP results in
this video are for arginine dosing over 2 hours prior to
exercise, not one. But the difference between one and two hours
may only be small. In making this video I read that arginine
metabolizes quickly, and so dosing within the hour might be better than within two hours.
Postscript number two. In preparing this video, I thought I’d repeat
my experiment, just to be sure, before uploading to
YouTube. I used doses of 3, 4 and 5g of arginine.
When I got the results, I was in for a surprise. This is the effect of 3g, this is the effect
of 4g and this is the effect of 5g of arginine and
aerobic exercise. At first I was disappointed.
There seemed to be no BP lowering effect. But when I looked closer and had a think about
it, I smiled. My day to day BP level had in fact dropped.
A mean arterial pressure around here represents a BP of just above 140/90.
Which means my BP is now consistently just above 140/90.
A noticeable drop from what it was before – 150/100.
In other words, arginine and exercise lowered my BP a small amount, and most importantly,
it kept it there for a couple of days.
Arginine’s effect, I realized, may not be so temporary or short lived as I read.
140/90 is still too high for my cardiologist, but, hey, I’m headed in the right direction.
There are supplements that are said to enhance arginin’s effect, and I could go on to test
those. However, it may be better for me to move on
to experimenting with different supplements altogether.
There’s probably a mix of reasons why my BP is elevated, and if so, this suggests the
use of a combination of supplements. And not just one.
Each supplement probably works through different mechanisms of action, so it makes sense to
test them all. And not just stop at arginin.
And finally, postscript number three. To help you figure out your optimal dose of
arginine, you could try the formula you see here.
It’s taken from page 974 of “Clinical Naturopathic Medicine” by Leah Hechtman.
And I also found it being used by a preventive medical clinic in Palm Springs, California.
It’s in their PDF in the section entitled “Non-medication approach to hypertension”.
With my weight of 184lbs, and using this formula, I calculate a dose of 4 grams.
Which is about I worked it to be on my own. So this formula looks reliable.
If you’d like to be updated on my future videos on other supplements, please click the red
subscribe button below this video. In conclusion, arginine taken just before
aerobic exercise may lower high blood pressure. The fall may only be modest. But anything
helps. The dose of arginine required may be around
half a gram per ten kilograms of body weight. The effect may last a couple of days, or perhaps
longer. Please visit my webpage below for a list of
resources. Good luck in your health endeavours. I wish
you good health and longevity. One final word.
I am not a doctor. Please consult a doctor for your medical condition,
especially before starting or changing your exercise program.
Thanks for watching. Cheers.