Heart Attack Care – Mark’s Story

Heart Attack Care – Mark’s Story


[music]>>MARK: I’ve been lobstering for 46 years. I started out with my dad. And I’ve been going ever since. So, that’s a keeper. I like to bring my traps in for the winter
because of the weather. I was over at the beach doing some shoveling,
the whole bit. There was a friend of mine right there with
me. I said, “Boy, I really don’t feel good.” And he goes, “Just sit down for a minute.” “You’ll be alright,” he says. [siren] Told him to call 911. We went to Southern
Maine. The other ambulance came and then they wheeled
me out and away I went to Maine Medical. [music]>>[inaudible]… is ready. Starting new case.>>DR. THOMAS RYAN: There aren’t many things
in medicine as dramatic as opening up an artery and stopping
a heart attack. You have roughly, you know, 2, 3, 4 hours
to open up that artery and stop the heart attack.>>DR. DAVID BURKEY: Here we go. Picture,
ready? So it is going to be the L-A-D. How you feeling up there? 2 of your arteries are completely open and
look great. And one of them has got a 95 percent narrowing
in it.>>DR. RYAN: We have an expression that time
is muscle and our program is designed to peel off time.>>DR. BURKEY: It’s going to take another
15 minutes or so. You OK up there?>>DR. RYAN: In early 2000, the way we treated
heart attacks changed dramatically. We shifted from treating patients with clot-busting
medications over to sometimes using angioplasty to mechanically
open up the artery.>>DR. BURKEY: We just put the stent in.>>PARAMEDIC: Lift your arm there.>>DR. RYAN: If a patient activates 911, the
EMS team does an electrocardiogram. They diagnose the heart attack and then they
activate the system. We work towards developing protocols and pathways so that patients entering a MaineHealth hospital
got the best care for the location they presented to and were
rapidly transferred to Maine Medical Center for ultimate care of their heart attack. A critical part to our success has been to
ensure that the patient leaves Maine Medical Center after their episode
of care and returns to their local community for ongoing
local cardiovascular care.>>DR. BRANDEI WINGARD: It helps to have patients
be able to come back to their community after having
a heart attack. We’re able to follow them, adjusting their
medications, looking for any concern for further disease. We do offer a cardiac rehab which is great
for our patients. It helps them to develop good exercise habits. It also makes them more confident in what
they can do afterwards. [music]>>DR. RYAN: When we started the program,
about 50 percent of patients received what we would consider timely care. What we know now is that we’re doing that
over 90 percent of the time. We’ve cut the death rate from having a heart
attack by about 50 percent in the MaineHealth communities. We’re problem solvers. We train together,
we work together, and because of that, our system is far more
efficient and patients are going home sooner.>>MARK: That’s why I’m still here today,
because of all those people. I’m really happy to be back. I can go lobstering and been doing basically
everything that I always have. [splash] I was really lucky. [music]