Does Prediabetes Increase My Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease?

Does Prediabetes Increase My Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease?


Hello, I am Ty Mason of thediabetescouncil.com,
researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. I want to emphasize that my perspective is
coming from one with Type 2 and not Type 1. Our channel is primarily for those with Type
2 Diabetes and PreDiabetes. Today I want to answer the question Does prediabetes
increase my risk of cardiovascular disease? After you watch the video today, I invite
you check out the description box for my new ebook. This is one of the most comprehensive diabetes
meal planning book you can find. It contains diabetes friendly meals/recipes,
recipes for different goals such as 800-1800 calories per day meal plan, diabetes meal
planning tips and tricks. There are also tons of diabetes friendly recipes
for everyone! The short answer to this question is yes,
unfortunately it does. A recent study of over 1 million people with
prediabetes worldwide, found that those with prediabetes have a 13% increased chance of
CVD than those without it. Here is the conclusion of the study:
In conclusion, we found that prediabetes defined as impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose
tolerance is associated with an increased risk of composite cardiovascular events, coronary
heart disease, stroke, and all cause mortality. There was an increased risk in people with
fasting plasma glucose as low as 5.6 mmol/L. Additionally, the risk of composite cardiovascular
events and coronary heart disease increased in people with raised HbA1c. These results support the lower cut-off point
for impaired fasting glucose according to ADA criteria as well as the incorporation
of HbA1c in defining prediabetes. At present, lifestyle modification is the
mainstay management for people with prediabetes. High risk subpopulations with prediabetes,
especially combined with other cardiovascular risk factors, should be selected for controlled
trials of pharmacological treatment. According to the American Journal of the College
of Cardiology The only way to delay cardiovascular disease
in patients with pre-diabetes is to prevent (or delay) the development of diabetes. Unfortunately, there is no proven way to prevent
the decline in beta cell function in persons destined to have diabetes. Therefore, priority must be given to reducing
insulin resistance. This is best achieved by lifestyle intervention—weight
reduction and increased physical activity. Consequently, all persons with pre-diabetes
should be encouraged to engage in a lifestyle intervention program. If need be, professional assistance is useful. We also acknowledge that other studies have
found that metformin therapy also could delay conversion of pre-diabetes to diabetes in
about 40% of subjects. This has led to a recommendation on the part
of some diabetologists for the use of metformin in persons with prediabetes. So, yes your chances of CVD are increased
by prediabetes, but not a certainty. The best way to prevent heart problems, is
to keep your status at PRE diabetes. How do you do that? Treatments
The American Diabetes Association says that serious lifestyle changes are effective in
preventing type 2 diabetes after you’ve been diagnosed with pre-diabetes. Your doctor will walk you through what you
need to change, but typical recommendations are:
Eat well: A registered dietitian (RD) or certified diabetes educator (CDE) can help you create
a meal plan that’s full of good-for-you and good-for-your-blood-glucose-level food. The goal of the meal plan is to control your
blood glucose level and keep it in the healthy, normal range. Your meal plan will be made just for you,
taking into account your overall health, physical activity, and what you like to eat. Exercise: When you exercise, your body uses
more glucose, so exercising can lower your blood glucose level. Also when you exercise, your body doesn’t
need as much insulin to transport the glucose; your body becomes less insulin resistant. Since your body isn’t using insulin well
when you have prediabetes, a lower insulin resistance is a very good thing. And of course, there are all the traditional
benefits of exercise: it can help you lose weight, keep your heart healthy, make you
sleep better, and even improve your mood. The American Diabetes Association recommends
at least 150 minutes of moderate activity a week—that’s 30 minutes five days a week. You can get that through activities such as
walking, bike riding, or swimming. Lose weight: If you’re overweight, you should
get started on a weight loss program as soon as you’re diagnosed with prediabetes. Losing just 5 to 10% of your weight can significantly
reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The combination of eating well and exercising
more is a great way to lose weight—and then maintain your new, healthy weight. Metformin: For people who are at a very high
risk of developing type 2 diabetes after being diagnosed with prediabetes, the doctor may
recommend a medication. The American Diabetes Association says that
metformin should be the only medication used to prevent type 2. It works by keeping the liver from making
more glucose when you don’t need it, thereby keeping your blood glucose level in a better
range. Your doctor will keep a close watch on your
blood glucose levels, monitoring them to make sure that your pre-diabetes doesn’t become
type 2 diabetes. If needed, he or she may suggest adjustments
(e.g., different diet or more exercise) to better control your blood glucose levels. Don’t forget to get my new ebook and please,
subscribe to our channel for many more videos like this one in the future. Thanks for watching. I am Ty Mason.