Diabesity (Part 1) – Who’s got it? What’s the cost?

Diabesity (Part 1) – Who’s got it? What’s the cost?


This is gonna be the first video in a
series on diabesity. I’m not sure if you look that up in the dictionary whether
you’re actually gonna find that as a word, but I think we all get the
connection. Let’s talk about this for a few minutes. First of all the staggering costs of
diabetes in America. There are 30 million Americans with diabetes. This is
according to the CDC, and they say 86 million with prediabetes. If you’ve seen
other videos on our channel, you know that that estimate is very conservative.
It’s based only on fasting glucose numbers as well as hemoglobin A1c. You
can miss. It’s hard to tell right now because there’s not a lot of studies
that that draw this linkage. But in my experience, an estimate… if you add an
insulin survey or OGTT to those two tests, you get probably at least 30… maybe
50% more people actually have prediabetes than the CDC is estimating
here. Bottom line is we have no clue how many people actually have prediabetes.
People say that the diabetes and prediabetes epidemic is driven by the
obesity epidemic. And I would say… and there’s two different sides to that
point… the first one is aging is actually a more powerful driver of prediabetes
and diabetes. The second thing I’d say though is that aging and obesity
tends to go along with aging. You talked about that
“middle-aged spread.” So in one day there today, there’ll be over almost 4,000
people diagnosed with diabetes. The cost is estimated to be 322 billion per year.
1 in 3 Medicare dollars is spent on people with diabetes. And again, this
is not talking about cardiovascular issues, heart attack, stroke risk for
people with prediabetes. This is 1 in 3 dollars being spent on people with
full-blown diabetes, and 1 in 5 healthcare dollars overall being spent
on people with diabetes. So again, there’s a lot of diabetes, and it’s having
huge impact on us as a nation. It’s having a huge impact on the rest of
the world. Thank you for your interest. This is Ford Brewer. I started off my career
as an ER doc. And that can be frustrating because most of the things bringing
patients into the ER can and should be prevented, like heart attack and stroke.
So I went to Johns Hopkins for training in prevention. Did well, ended up running
the program. Trained dozens of docs there, and have trained hundreds and even
over a thousand doctors since then in preventing disease. What’s even more
important is I’ve helped thousands of patients prevent heart attack aand stroke
rather than waiting for the devastation and hoping for a cure.