CBCI Patient Encourages all Cancer Patients Saying “You Can Get Through This!”

CBCI Patient Encourages all Cancer Patients Saying “You Can Get Through This!”


(slow tempo music) – Hi, I’m Brad Colby, and I’m at Presbyterian/St. Luke’s Medical Center. So my journey began in
March, probably of 2015. I started to feel a small
growth in my right groin through a couple of months of time, it became apparent that
that was continuing to grow. I saw my regular doc, my
primary care physician, who referred me to an
oncologist, who diagnosed me with mantle cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. I was referred early on in
that process by my oncologist to Colorado Blood Cancer Institute. And then did six rounds of chemotherapy through my primary oncologist. Had a couple of PET scans
along the way, actually three, once at the diagnosis, one after the first three rounds of chemotherapy, and
then a final PET scan, and I think that was
probably October of 2015. I was in full metabolic
remission at that point in time, and ready to be handed off to Colorado Blood Cancer Institute, for my stem cell transplant. So in October of 2015, I landed at CBCI. Went through a battery
of tests to make sure I was healthy enough to
continue on the journey through the stem cell transplant. My stem cells were harvested,
I think probably around the third week of October in 2015. And I was slated for the
final round of chemotherapy, which is very high dose, high strength chemo. The stem cell journey
really is about withstanding that chemotherapy that started
on November 16th of 2015. My stem cells were transplanted
on November the 23rd of 2015 and I began my, I really began my journey, right about that day of the
healing from the chemotherapy, prior to the stem cell transplant. I was healthy enough on the
front side of all of that to do that on an outpatient basis, which meant about 30 days of visit to the clinic on a daily basis. Once that I had received
that chemotherapy, and the stem cell transplant,
it was a daily journey back to Colorado Blood Cancer Institute, where I was met every
morning with nurses, doctors, physicians’ assistants,
that were very thorough, watched my blood counts,
watched my temperature, all of my vitals. I was monitored very
closely to ensure that through that journey, when you really have no immune system left, and
you’re really vulnerable, and you’re really compromised, you’ll learn that the world
is a pretty scary place. And the care, the
experience, the expertise, and the treatment that I receive through that part of my journey, and my story was really outstanding. Probably the single biggest memory I have, or what really stood
out, it turned out that I started my outpatient
treatment the same day as another young, a little
younger guy than myself. And he and I came to the clinic everyday, and we journeyed together,
and just the bond and the connection that he and
and I were able to establish, going through what we were
going through together. It was really amazing how
you can connect with someone that you hardly know. But when you journey through
really hard circumstances, you can really connect,
and get to know people. Another stand out memory for me, was just the care I got from,
especially the nurse and staff who were there everyday. You saw basically the same
nurses, and just the commitment to the care that you received,
and just the knowledge and the expertise they had. And I guess that’s the
other really big memory is, I came to realize pretty
quickly, how smart and how dedicated the docs
were, that were treating me. So the biggest thing would
be, you can get through this. The diagnosis was scary,
the journey at times, seemed really, really long. I’m about a year out from my diagnosis. And my stem cell transplant,
and you can get through it. The care you get, the
expertise that’s around, you can make it through that journey and get back to a normal
healthy lifestyle. Exercise hard, good attitude, your faith, and you can work your way through it. (slow tempo music)