Blood vessel-on-a-chips show anti-cancer drug effects in human cells

Blood vessel-on-a-chips show anti-cancer drug effects in human cells


My name is Joris Pauty. I am a researcher at the laboratory of Professor Yukiko Matsunaga and a member of the french-japanese laboratory LIMMS. We developed a method to study in vitro the formation of new blood vessels from a pre-existing one, a phenomenon known as sprouting angiogenesis. In some diseases, such as cancer, diabetic retinopathy and rheumatoid polyarthritis, the angiogenesis is abnormal and contributes to the disease progression. That is why drugs that inhibit or regulate the angiogenesis have been developed. The method is based on fabrication by tissue engineering of a human blood vessel mimic in a silicone chip. The use of such a few cm-scale chip enables the combination of biological analytical methods to obtain multiple information at once. This technology can be used to develop and study new therapeutic molecules in a more relevant model than classical in vitro methods. This should contribute to improving research and development of anti-angiogenic therapies.