Before Cancer Surgery, Blood Thinners Appeared Safe

Before Cancer Surgery, Blood Thinners Appeared Safe


Cancer patients have enough to worry about
— they shouldn’t have to worry about the health effects of medications taken before
cancer surgery. And new evidence suggests they may not have to. I’m Shelby Cullinan
with your latest health news. Blood-thinning drugs given to cancer patients
before cancer surgery were not tied to an increased risk of transfusions or major bleeding,
a new study found. These researchers compared 2,058 cancer patients who received blood-thinning
drugs (anticoagulants) before major surgery to 4,960 who had major surgeries but didn’t
receive presurgery blood-thinning drugs. Their findings appeared to contradict what some
believe about the effects of anticoagulants: There was no measurable difference in major
bleeding events between the two groups of patients. And those who received the blood-thinning
drugs before surgery were actually less likely to require a blood transfusion. Lead author
Dr. Strong said she believed this research has “broad-reaching, practice-changing implications.”
Speak to your doctor about the risks and benefits of any medication you may be taking.