39-Year-Old Marathon Runner Survives Widow Maker Heart Attack

39-Year-Old Marathon Runner Survives Widow Maker Heart Attack


[Voice of emergency services representative]: 9-1-1, what is your emergency? [Voice of patient’s wife, Megan Smith]: Yes, my husband is sweating profusely, has chest pains, is nauseous, he can’t feel his hands. [Voice of patient, Philip Smith]: That day I had a long run. It was a humid, hot day. I came in the house, and I actually went upstairs. I could just feel this sensation right here in the middle of my chest. It just increasingly got worse and worse. I started getting cold sweats, I was nauseous. [Voice of patient’s wife, Megan Smith]: He just kept saying, “I feel really, really, off…I just don’t feel well.” He was laying down, and I think what got me was, he then moved his hands and he said, “I can’t feel my hands.” [Voice of Frisco Fire Department first responder, Edwin Rivera]: We were all here at the station, and we got a call out for routine chest pain so we go out there. Once we got further into our assessment, we noticed he was having a pretty big heart attack. We transmitted our EKG over to the hospital they could see what we’re seeing. [Voice of Director of Emergency Services, Gary Busby]: This is Medical City Frisco ER, go ahead with your report. [Voice of Frisco Fire Department first responder, Edwin Garcia]: We’re always going to be calling the receiving facility, so whenever we arrive on scene, the physicians and all their staff are going to be waiting for us. So as soon as we arrived at the hospital, we were backing into the ambulance bay and the patient actually went unconscious. Within seconds, we delivered 360 joules of energy, and then we continued with our compressions. [Voice of ER Nurse Supervisor, Stephanie Oldaker]: Everybody was here the second he got in the room, and we ended up coding him three different times, and shocking him three different times and finally got him back. [Voice of Emergency Medicine Physician, Meera, Chopra, MD]: Time is of the essence for the patient because if they don’t end up in the cardiac cath lab, then typically the patient will die from this type of occlusion. So it’s important that (cardiologist) Dr. Marc Krock was here, we were all ready to go and send this patient to the cath lab and get him treated. [Voice of Cardiologist, Marc Krock, MD]: The catheter is coming up right here to the left of the main artery. He had a one hundred percent blockage, which is a complete blockage of the front vessel of his heart. It’s got a name of the ‘widow maker’ vessel. The sooner we get that open, the greater the likelihood of survival. This case is a perfect example of identifying the signs of a heart attack. The sooner you call, the sooner EMS arrives, and it starts the chain of care – the more likely you’ll survive. [Voice of patient, Philip Smith]: You know we just moved into this house a year ago, you know a mile away from the fire station and really close to the hospital. It’s just the way they all work together, the first responders, the nurses, the doctors, everyone. We owe them everything. You know, I wouldn’t be here. I’m very grateful for what they did.